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Interviews

"Design approaches that reflect the thinking of the times": Interview with Prof. Dr. Zong Mingming

We talked with Prof. Dr. Zong Mingming, beyond bauhaus jury member, about the importance of the Bauhaus, the potential of the winning projects and the international competition. More

"The number of promising ideas is grandiose": Interview with beyond bauhaus jury member Oliver Jahn

We spoke with Oliver Jahn, member of the international jury of the competition „beyond bauhaus - prototyping the future”, about the significance of the bauhaus concept for the present and future, the international competition and the prizewinners. More

"The projects reach beyond the original borders of Bauhaus": Interview with Juliana Braga de Mattos

The international competition "beyond bauhaus - prototyping the future", sought ground-breaking design ideas and concepts that address a socially relevant topic and provide creative answers to the pressing questions of our time.With Juliana Braga de Mattos we talked about the importance of the Bauhaus and the international competition. More

„Combining Realism and Megalomania”: Interview with „beyond bauhaus” jury member Wolfram Putz

The international jury of the competition „beyond bauhaus - prototyping the future” consists of experts from a wide range of design disciplines. Architect Wolfram Putz is one of them and he told us what he associates with the Bauhaus and what he expects of the entries in the competition „beyond bauhaus - prototyping the future“. More

„The Bauhaus as a kickstarter”: Interview with „beyond bauhaus" jury member Christian Benimana

Christian Benimana talked to us about what the Bauhaus idea can still offer students today and about his hope of using the competition to select projects that inspire global solutions. More

„Everyone has a right to good design”: Interview with "beyond bauhaus" jury member Lisa Lang

Lisa Lang, member of the jury of the competition „beyond bauhaus - prototyping the future”, told us how the Bauhaus has influenced her and what design can do for society. More

„The Bauhaus School influenced the way we live today and tomorrow”: Interview with jury member Eyal Gever

Eyal Gever, member of the international jury of the competition „beyond bauhaus - prototyping the future”, told us about the importance of the Bauhaus in Israel and how Bauhaus ideas still influence us today. More

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"The projects reach beyond the original borders of Bauhaus": Interview with Juliana Braga de Mattos

The international competition "beyond bauhaus - prototyping the future", sought ground-breaking design ideas and concepts that address a socially relevant topic and provide creative answers to the pressing questions of our time. The 20 award winners convinced the international jury with their ideas and concepts. Juliana Braga de Mattos is a member of the jury.

She is the manager of Visual and Media Arts Department of Sesc (Social Service of the Commerce) in the state of Sao Paulo/ Brazil. Under her coordination, the department is responsible for the development of Sesc’s visual arts and media program - which includes a diversified range of national and international exhibitions, workshops, seminars and educational program. Since 2006 represents officially Sesc abroad.

With Juliana Braga de Mattos we talked about the importance of the Bauhaus and the international competition.

Given its one-hundredth anniversary, the Bauhaus is currently on everyone's lips. What makes the Bauhaus so popular today?
The Bauhaus was amazingly avant-garde when it began. Its legacy remains extremely meaningful, underscoring the importance of erasing barriers between art and design, between "high" and "low" culture, but also on emphasizing the role of art for social development and the common good. These are the major aspects of the continued relevance of the lessons of the Bauhaus—particularly given the existence of such asymmetrical social contexts around the world, over the past century and still today.

Many creative people worldwide have participated in the competition. How do you explain this enormous response?
The beyond bauhaus competition focused on three crucial criteria: creative vision, sustainability and social impact. I consider the connection among these three aspects really important for many creators, who come from different contexts but who share similar feelings and ideas about the urgency of sustainability and social development as a global matter.

What potential do you see in the award-winning projects?
Full potential! Most of the winning projects are both visionary and accessible. Moreover, the majority of the projects selected by the international jury share a concern for the common good, and they reach beyond the original borders of Bauhaus, as the title of the competition avers.

How important is the Bauhaus in Brazil today?
The Bauhaus is an inescapable reference if you study art or culture in Brazil. But in such a diverse and complex society, we cannot hope to have one common interpretation of the Bauhaus legacy and discourse. Nevertheless, the connections between vernacular and popular traditions in the history of Brazilian art, design and architecture have been ongoing since the early days of modernism. Reviewing these debates and discussions today, it is easy to see how much the Bauhaus was an influence.

In your opinion, to what extent is the Bauhaus legacy still suitable for addressing global challenges?
One cannot deny the importance of looking again at the historical Bauhaus to inspire new perspectives on current global challenges. The question is how to take the Bauhaus experience and adapt it to a radically changing world; a world where technology can be a fantastic platform for sharing thoughts and responding to social issues, but that also steamrolls over the particularities and diversity of our so-called global society.

Do you see in the Bauhaus idea a potential for global dialogue?
Yes, I do, particularly in the sense that we are increasingly open to a horizontal, non-hierarchical dialogue with differently composed societies, beyond the so-called white, patriarchal, occidental bases of the Western world. Achieving this perspective remains a challenge in contemporary times.